UK network operator offers earlier grid connections for 836 MW

UK Power Networks’ (UKPN) distribution system operator (DSO) is expediting grid connections for 25 UK projects, totaling 836 MW.

UKPN‘s DSO has developed a fast-track connection scheme so 25 projects in the United Kingdom can quickly connect to the grid. The “Technical Limits” program uses insights from UKPN’s distributed energy resource management platform to offer earlier connections.

The scheme has been designed to cut years off connection times for developers of projects who were initially told they could have to wait up to a decade, or even longer in some cases, as some new solar projects are already securing grid connection dates past 2035 in the United Kingdom.

The projects that have accepted the fast-track offer have a cumulative capacity of 836 MW, which amounts to roughly one-fifth of the peak demand of London’s distribution network, according to UKPN.

They include a 98 MW solar farm in eastern England and a 100 MW combined storage and solar site in the southeastern part of the country. There are 14 projects in the scheme across all of eastern England, totaling 465 MW, and 11 schemes in Kent, Surrey and Sussex, totaling 371 MW.

UKPN said the announcement is the first phase of a series that will release multiple gigawatts of capacity for generation projects in 2024.

“We’re taking real, tangible action to help our customers overcome the long-term challenges on the national transmission system, an approach that is ultimately going to get more green energy into more people’s homes and businesses,” said UKPN Director of DSO Sotiris Georgiopoulos.

Giles Frampton, director of Evolution Power Ltd., said the connection date for one of the company’s PV projects will be brought forward by four years under the scheme.

“UK Power Networks’ proactive engagement with developers is making a real difference to schemes that are ready to deliver low-carbon, low cost, sustainable green energy for the benefit of all,” added Frampton.

This post appeared first on PV Magazine.

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