Johnson Controls unveils water-to-water heat pump for commercial buildings

US-based Johnson Controls says its new 1,406 kW compound centrifugal heat pump is able to deliver high-temperature hot water as high as 77 C.The system reportedly has a combined coefficient of performance of 4.9.

US-based industrial conglomerate Johnson Controls has introduced a water-to-water compound centrifugal heat pump intended for use in commercial buildings.

The York Cyk heat pump is designed for high-head conditions and can reportedly deliver high-temperature hot water as high as 77 C.

“The York Cyk can reduce water and operational costs by as much as 50% when compared to traditional boiler and chiller applications,” the manufacturer said in a statement.

The new product is currently available in a small version with a 400-ton cooling capacity. It offers 1,406 kW if output for cooling and 2,051 kW for heating.

The company said the system has a combined coefficient of performance of 4.9. It may use either the R-1234ze or the R-515b refrigerants, which Johnson Controls said have ultra-low global warming potential (GWP).

The heat pump also features two electric motor-driven centrifugal compressors arranged in series and double bundle condenser technology that can cope with unbalanced load conditions, according to the company.

“The innovative design is compatible with existing high-temperature hot water heating systems, eliminating the need to replace air handlers and terminal heating devices, which is often required to accommodate the lower water temperatures associated with other heat pump products,” said the company.

Johnson Controls plans to launch a second version of the heat pump with a 2,000-ton cooling capacity and an output of 7,033 kW at an unspecified later stage.

“The York Cyk heat pump is ideal for medium to large commercial buildings, university campuses, hospitals, industrial processes and district energy applications and can be used in new building or retrofit applications,” it said. 

This post appeared first on PV Magazine.

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