Bahrain launches tender for 72 MW of solar

The Kingdom of Bahrain has kicked off a tender to award a 20-year contract to a local or international company to build, own, operate and maintain a grid-connected solar project with a minimum capacity of 72 MWc in the Sakhir region.

Bahrain is seeking developers to deliver a minimum of 72 MWc of rooftop and ground-mount PV capacity in the Sakhir region. The tender, launched by Bahrain’s Ministry of Electricity and Water Affairs, is open to both local and international bidders.

Under a 20-year contract, the selected developer will be expected to build, own, operate and maintain solar arrays on rooftops, carpark shades, and electric-vehicle charging stations on land belonging to the Bahrain International Circuit, the University of Bahrain, the Bahrain International Exhibition and Convention Centre, and the Al Dana Amphitheatre.

To qualify for the tender, bidders need to be engaged in the solar business, with a track record of at least 10 grid-tied solar projects. At least five of those installations should be solar carpark projects, the ministry said.

It added that bidders should have commissioned at least 40 MWac of grid-tied solar PV projects in any country throughout the world within the last three years. Bidders can obtain tendering documents and submit proposals through the Bahrain Tender Board website.

“The launch of this tender comes as part of the Kingdom’s wider vision to adopt a circular carbon economy, with the aim to bring carbon emissions in Bahrain to net zero by 2060,” said H.E. Yasser bin Ebrahim Humaidan, Bahrain’s minister of electricity and water affairs.

Bahrain wants to bring 255 MW of solar generation capacity online by 2025 by using net meteringtenders for large-scale projects, and a renewable energy mandate for new buildings. The kingdom’s renewable energy target envisages 700 MW of solar, wind and energy-from-waste generation capacity by 2030.

According to the International Renewable Energy Agency, the Middle Eastern country had just 10 MW of installed PV capacity by the end of 2020.

This post appeared first on PV Magazine.

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